Tag Archives: ww1

Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold to all Austro-Hungarian Missions, 28 July 1914 – Part III

On 28 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold (pictured), sent a private telegram to all Austro-Hungarian Missions. His telegram details the Serbian response to Austria-Hungary’s ultimatum, as well as the Austro-Hungarian cabinet’s reaction to it. The following is part III of that telegram (see previous post). Translation. The Royal Serbian government, […]

Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold To All Austro-Hungarian Missions, 28 July 1914 – Part II

On 28 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold (pictured), sent a private telegram to all Austro-Hungarian Missions. His telegram details the Serbian response to Austria-Hungary’s ultimatum, as well as the Austro-Hungarian cabinet’s reaction to it. The following is part II of that telegram (see previous post).   Translation. The Royal […]

Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold to All Austro-Hungarian Missions, 28 July 1914 – Part I

On 28 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold (pictured), sent a private telegram to all Austro-Hungarian Missions. His telegram details the Serbian response to Austria-Hungary’s ultimatum, as well as the Austro-Hungarian cabinet’s reaction to it. The following is part I of that telegram. Count Berchtold to all the Austro-Hungarian Missions. […]

Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold to Count Szapary, 28 July 1914

On 28 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold (pictured), sent a private telegram to the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador to Russia, Frigyes Count Szapary. In his telegram, Berchtold reminds Szapary that Austria-Hungary will not come to a negotiated settlement with Serbia despite Russian diplomatic overtures. Berchtold also describes his conversation with the […]

Book Review: The Forgotten Monarch by Matthieu Santerre.

Originally posted on Adventures In Historyland:
? http://www.amazon.com/Forgotten-Monarch-Franz-Joseph-Outbreak-ebook/dp/B01CT0PD50/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1457964372&sr=1-1&keywords=The+forgotten+monarch File Size: 593 KB Publisher: Sainte-Ursule Books; 1 edition (March 15, 2016) Publication Date: March 15, 2016 Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC Language: English Not a day ago I was asked to explain some of the reasons why Europeans went to war between 1745 and 1882.…

The Forgotten Monarch: Franz Joseph and the Outbreak of the First World War

This is not a usual post for JulyCrisis1914. Usually, I focus on a primary source document, often diplomatic, detailing the events that led to the outbreak of the First World War in the summer of 1914. I try to be objective by presenting facts and context. However, if you feel you want more analysis on […]

Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Szapary to Count Berchtold, 28 July 1914

On 28 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador to Russia, Frigyes Count Szapary (pictured), sent a coded telegram to the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold. In his telegram, Szapary describes Russian perceptions of the Austro-German alliance days before the outbreak of the First World War. Count Szapary to Count Berchtold. Petersburg, 28 July 1914. Cyphered. […]

Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Mensdorff to Count Berchtold, 28 July 1914

On 28 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador to the United Kingdom, Albert Count Mensdorff (pictured), sent a coded telegram to the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold. In his telegram, Mensdorff adds to his telegram of 27 July in which he described British fears of escalation of the Austro-Serbian conflict into a World […]